Xkcd

Rainbowing a set of pictures

I’ve now done a few collages from R using magick: the faces of #rstats Twitter, We R-Ladies with Lucy D’Agostino McGowan, and a holiday card for R-Ladies. The faces of #rstats Twitter and holiday card collages were arranged at random, while the We R-Ladies one was a mosaic forming the R-Ladies logo. I got the idea to up my collage skills by trying to learn how to arrange pics by their main colour, like a rainbow. The verb rainbow doesn’t exist, and “rainbowing” doesn’t mean ordering by colour, but I didn’t let this stop me.

It was the occasion to grab some useful knowledge about colours, not useless for someone who did not even know about Pantone’s Colors of the Year a few weeks ago…

This post has nothing to do with Kesha’s new album. However, you can listen to it while reading since it’s so good, but maybe switch to something older from her when I use “$”.

Where to live in the US

I was fascinated by this xkcd comic about where to live based on your temperature preferences. I also thought it’d be fun to try to make a similar one from my R session! Since I’m no meteorologist and was a bit unsure of how to define winter and summer, and of their relevance in countries like, say, India which has monsoon, I decided to focus on a single country located in one hemisphere only and big enough to offer some variety… the USA! So, dear American readers, where should you live based on your temperature preferences?

How not to make an evergreen review graph

In this post I am inspired by two tweets, mainly this one and also this one. Since the total number of articles every year is increasing, no matter which subject you choose, the curve representing number of articles as a function of year of publication will probably look exponential, so one should not use such graphs to impress readers. At least I’m not impressed, I’m more amused by such graphs now that there’s a hashtag for them.

I shall use an rOpenSci package for getting some data about number of articles about a query term, and to do a graph that’s not an evergreen review graph!