Conference

Storrrify #satRdayCapeTown 2018

One week ago I was in Cape Town for the local satRday conference, where I had the honor to be one of the two keynote speakers, the other one being sports analytics extraordinaire Stephanie Kovalchik (You can read Stephanie Kovalchik’s account of the conference in this blog post). It was a fantastic experience! The event was very well organized, and 100% corresponds to its description as a “one day conference packed with R goodness”. You can watch all talks on Youtube. In my talk, I presented rOpenSci onboarding system of packages and… wore a hard hat!

It’d be a bit hard for me to really write a good recap of satRday that’d do it justice! Instead, I’ll use rtweet and a bit of html hacking to storrrify it (like Storify, but in R) using my live tweets!

How to develop good R packages (for open science)

I was invited to an exciting ecology & R hackathon in my capacity as a co-editor for rOpenSci onboarding system of packages. It also worked well geographically since this hackathon was to take place in Ghent (Belgium) which is not too far away from my new city, Nancy (France). The idea was to have me talk about my “top tips on how to design and develop high-quality, user-friendly R software” in the context of open science, and then be a facilitator at the hackathon.

The talk topic sounded a bit daunting but as soon as I started preparing the talk I got all excited gathering resources – and as you may imagine since I was asked to talk about my tips I did not need to try & be 100% exhaustive. I was not starting from scratch obviously: we at rOpenSci already have well-formed opinions about such software, and I had given a talk about automatic tools for package improvement whose content was part of my top tips.

As I’ve done in the past with my talks, I chose to increase the impact/accessibility of my work by sharing it on this blog. I’ll also share this post on the day of the hackathon to provide my audience with a more structured document than my slides, in case they want to keep some trace of what I said (and it helped me build a good narrative for the talk!). Most of these tips will be useful for package development in general, and a few of them specific to scientific software.